I’ve followed football (or soccer) for as long as I can remember, yet despite living just 20 miles away I never visited the National Football Museum at its previous home at Preston North End’s Deepdale stadium.

In 2012 the museum relocated to the Urbis Building in Manchester opposite the city’s Victoria station and it was in passing that we decided to go in for a look around.

Entrance is free which is always a bonus and we paid a pound for a guide book that gives a little insight into what to expect.

The Football Collections

The collections cover the drama, history, skill, art, faith style and passion of football and are found on the first and second level. Levels three and four house changing exhibitions which unfortunately were closed on our visit.

The noise of a passionate crowd roared as we wandered around the displays on Level one which include the replica Jules Rimet trophy lifted by Bobby Moore when England won the World Cup in 1966. The room was busy with people glancing at displays or playing with the interactive features.

One of the most interesting features I found was the FA 1863 minute book in which the original laws of the game were written. I’m sure at lot has changed since.

Test Yourself with Football Plus

Level two is mainly made up of the Football Plus experiences; a chance to test yourself with challenges such as a penalty shoot out, one-two and Pass Master. These come at an extra cost and were full of kids hogging them so we gave them a wide berth.

As a child I collected and played with Subbuteo so looking into the small cabinet which housed some examples was like reminiscing about scoring the perfect flicked goal.

Up Close with the FA Cup

On the way out we passed the FA Cup and the opportunity to have a photo lifting the famous trophy but we balked at the £5 asking price.

We were only in the museum for half an hour but that was plenty of time to get around the two levels that were open.

Angie found it interesting despite a dislike for the sport but for me as a lifelong football fan, it was fascinating and I can’t believe I left it this long to visit.